Tesla launched a new trim of its Model S sedan, the P100D, August 23, a car it calls the quickest production vehicle currently available for sale, able to reach 60 mph (97 km/h) from a dead stop in 2.5 seconds.

That number, which the new Model S P100D can nail only in the appropriately named Ludicrous mode, puts it in league with a Porsche 911 Turbo S, Bugatti Chiron, and just behind a Ferrari LaFerrari.

The all-electric sedan’s performance is even more impressive considering it sports plenty of luggage space and room for five adults, though four passengers would surely slow the car’s acceleration.

Driving range has been increased, too, thanks to a new 100-kWh battery pack mounted in the floor of the vehicle to keep weight low in the chassis.

Under ideal circumstances, the P100D can muster 613 kilometers on the EU testing cycle; and 507 kilometers of range on the EPA test cycle–this constitutes the furthest range-on-a-single-charge any all-electric vehicle has been capable of to date.

Beyond the neck-straining acceleration and impressive mileage, Tesla cites further marque-specific benefits as incentive to buy its cars, including access to the Tesla Supercharger network and free software updates throughout ownership of the car.

The Tesla Supercharger network spans much of North America, with 18 charging stations located across Canada. Every station is free of charge for Tesla vehicle owners.

Current P90D Ludicrous mode-equipped car owners can upgrade their battery to the 100kWh model for $20,000, which includes the recycling fee for their old battery.

Those who have ordered but have yet to take delivery of their P90D can upgrade to the more powerful battery pack for $10,000.

It should be noted that the acceleration time of 2.5 seconds to 97 km/h (60 mph) is speculative, and hasn’t been track-proven in instrumented testing–though given the performance of the P90D Ludicrous mode, we have no reason to doubt Tesla’s claims.

It should also be noted that while the P100D’s acceleration is very impressive, it doesn’t make the car necessarily fast. Top speed is limited to 155 mph (250 km/h), and most sports cars will best the P100D around a racetrack given their superior braking and cornering performance.

(Tesla)